AstroSafariVans.com

Tech info and how to guides for ASV users


Seatbelt Connector Replacement


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4 files, last one added on Nov 19, 2007
Album viewed 80 times

Swaybar endlink replacement


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8 files, last one added on Nov 18, 2007
Album viewed 134 times

Headlight replacement pre 95


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11 files, last one added on Nov 18, 2007
Album viewed 95 times

Starter replacement 90 Safari


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6 files, last one added on Nov 20, 2007
Album viewed 66 times

Oil change


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9 files, last one added on Nov 20, 2007
Album viewed 89 times

700R4 Transmission RWD removal


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12 files, last one added on Nov 20, 2007
Album viewed 534 times

Fuel filter change 90 Safari


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7 files, last one added on Nov 20, 2007
Album viewed 133 times

T stat egr and rad removal


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25 files, last one added on Dec 26, 2007
Album viewed 129 times

Heater core replacement


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6 files, last one added on Feb 25, 2008
Album viewed 683 times

test album


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1 files, last one added on Feb 25, 2008
Album viewed 65 times

10 albums on 1 page(s)

Random files - Tech info for vans
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5173 viewsI removed the bezel completely as not to damage my paint. Unplug the light from the connector.
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8221 viewsReattach retaning ring with screws.
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302 viewsAs you can see from this pic,it would be very difficult to even get to the t stat without removing the fan shrouds
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Removing trim429 views1989 Astro Heater Core Replacement.

The smell of antifreeze when I used the heater told me that it was past time to change the heater core in my 89 Astro. It's a job I dreaded due to previous experiences with other vehicles, but it wasn't too bad actually. In fact, disassembly is a snap, but I had to get a touch creative to get it back together.

I removed the engine cover first; don't know if it's necessary, but it always seems like I have to do it no matter what I'm up to. Hey, that's the mighty 305 all nestled in the engine bay, by the way.
Next, remove the four Phillips headed screws that hold the heater trim piece in place and then remove the trim piece. Actually, it will fall off when the last screw is removed. Lay it and the screws out of the way.
I failed to get a usable photo of the heater box cover removal, but it's the black object with the louvers you see behind my hand. Four 7mm hex headed screws hold it in place. You'll have to get at floor mat level to see them all, but they're not bad to get at. Unscrew those fasteners and remove the heater box cover. Once that's off, you still won't see the heater core, though. That's because it's behind the heater core cover, located on the right of the heater box, and is held in place by three screws, also 7mm headed. An upcoming photo will give more detail on the location.

Last additions - Tech info for vans
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505 viewsFeb 25, 2008
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Connections at firewall494 viewsUnder the hood, on the passenger side of the firewall, you'll see the heater core hose connections. Drain the radiator (it holds about 6 quarts) and remove the heater hoses. You will probably also have to remove the heater blower motor relay and fuel pump relay bracket to make the hose removal easier, as I've done here. By the way, the silver relay is for the blower motor; the back relay is for the fuel pump.
Another note: I drain the radiator by use of a small hand pump. I snake the suction line of the pump down past the transmission cooler in the radiator tank until the hose bottoms, then I pump the coolant into a container. Sure beats trying to catch the antifreeze in a basin of some type after opening the radiator drain. And I'm getting old, guys, so I don't care to wallow around on the ground searching for the radiator drain if I don't have to.
Feb 25, 2008
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Heater core363 viewsHere's the heater core, in this case, it's the old leaky one I removed. Notice the small round post between the two heater hose nipples. That post must be placed into a hole in the heater box during the assembly of the new heater core. If you don't get it lined up correctly, you won't get the heater core to seat all the way into place and the screws for the heater core won't match up with their holes in the heater box.
Don't ask me how I know this.
Once the heater core is secure in its place, I'd suggest reconnecting the heater hoses and filling the radiator. After that, start and warm up the engine. Check for leaks; you sure don't want to have to tear back into all this in case something is wrong.
Feb 25, 2008
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Heater core cover344 viewsThis is the heater core cover. In this photo, we are looking inside at the rear of the cover; note that there is a channel here that continues on both sides of the cover. This channel's purpose is to engage a tab in the heater box and thereby seal the heater core in place. It's a nice idea, but that defroster mounting tab mentioned earlier will be right in the way of lining the cover up. In fact, I'd say that the tab makes lining the cover up almost impossible. So, after fighting that tab for a while, I did the only sane thing—I cut the tab off with a hacksaw blade, making sure I made the cut so I could reattach the tab later.Feb 25, 2008